niagara_falls_frozen

Niagara: The Frozen Falls

In Life by Continental StaffLeave a Comment

Despite the hysteria that surrounded last years polar vortex, this February has been even colder for Ontario. According to The Weather Network “our mean temperature is running about 3 degrees below last year’s (-8.3°C vs. -11.5°C) and 7 degrees below normal”. It isn’t the coldest February on record – that “award goes to the year of 1979 with a mean temperature of -10.8 degrees Celsius” – but that isn’t much of a consolation to freezing Ontarians.

Environment Canada has predicted another blast of arctic air that could plunge windchill temperatures to  -45 in Northern Ontario and -29 in Toronto in the coming days. Freezing temperatures have already tragically claimed at least one life this winter after 3 year old Elijah Marsh wandered out of his Toronto home.

Even Niagara Falls is feeling the effect of the cold. Although the falls are still flowing, a massive build up of ice has created a spectacular site for tourists.

Not everyone has lamented the frigid temperatures. One daredevil, Will Gadd, took the opportunity to scale the frozen falls. Watch his extraordinary feet here:

Meanwhile in New York the frigid temperatures have transformed a geyser into what people are calling a “frozen volcano”:

So while we all wait for things to warm up (even just a little) we can at least take solace in the fact that some people are enjoying the ice and snow. While constant sub-zero temperatures might not be everyone’s cup of tea, the frozen falls are a spectacular sight that won’t come around that often. So before spring starts inching (slowly) closer, be sure to make the most of the rough weather and take a trip down to Niagara! That being said, we don’t recommend scaling the ice unless your name is Will Gadd – and even then we wouldn’t advocate trying your luck.

Check out our ‘Boost’ section for more posts like this. Looking for a way to stay warm? Well the Chase the Chill campaign might be coming to your area!

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